Andy Murray will continue to play professional tennis for as long as he keeps "seeing progress" in his game, the Scot has revealed.

The former world number one was knocked out of the Hall of Fame Open by Alexander Bublik on Friday, with the Kazakh winning their quarter-final 7-5 6-4 in Newport.

It follows Murray's disappointing second-round exit at Wimbledon to John Isner, and while the 35-year-old wants to see results improve, he was optimistic ahead of the switch from grass to the hard-court season.

"Obviously I just want the results to be a bit better," Murray told the ATP Tour website. "I felt like I had a good chance of [winning] here. If I got through Bublik, it would have been a good opportunity potentially in the semi-finals.

"But… to have my body feeling pretty good and getting lots of matches in is important for me."

Murray did have some success on grass this year, including reaching the final of the Stuttgart Open before losing to Matteo Berrettini.

"There were some good moments, but also some tough ones," he added. "Today's match and the loss at Wimbledon were disappointing and frustrating for me, but then I also had my best wins in a while in Stuttgart.

"So a bit up and down, but a little bit of progress overall and I'll try and keep that going through the hard-court summer.

"[I want] to continue to improve. If I keep seeing progress I’ll continue to keep playing."

Murray met NFL quarterback Kirk Cousins earlier in the week, with the Minnesota Vikings star praising the tennis supremo's "grit", and Murray revealed Cousins was looking to incorporate tennis into his own preparations for the new season.

"I'd never actually met any NFL athletes before, but he seemed like he loved his tennis and he was saying that he feels like a lot of the movements you make in tennis are similar to a quarterback," Murray added.

"He would prefer to do an hour of tennis to an hour of agility drills, which I can understand as you get a little bit older, trying to keep things fresh and fun in training in pre-season is important."